Sowing Seeds of Interest

AP Human Geography takes a field trip to Whitehall Farm

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Sowing Seeds of Interest

Zoe Hendricks (11), Ritvik Chennupati (11), and Franci Yang (11) feed Whitehall Farm chickens as Farmer Jeff discusses the process of cultivation (Photo by Colleen Sherry).

Zoe Hendricks (11), Ritvik Chennupati (11), and Franci Yang (11) feed Whitehall Farm chickens as Farmer Jeff discusses the process of cultivation (Photo by Colleen Sherry).

Zoe Hendricks (11), Ritvik Chennupati (11), and Franci Yang (11) feed Whitehall Farm chickens as Farmer Jeff discusses the process of cultivation (Photo by Colleen Sherry).

Zoe Hendricks (11), Ritvik Chennupati (11), and Franci Yang (11) feed Whitehall Farm chickens as Farmer Jeff discusses the process of cultivation (Photo by Colleen Sherry).

Colleen Sherry, Editor-of-Online

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Farm-to-table isn’t always a process people consider; the food that comes to us pre-packaged and ready to eat is just that. But students in AP Human Geography at Langley got the chance to experience the agricultural process themselves when the classes took an exclusive field trip to Whitehall Farms, LLC.

After stepping off the bus and feeling frosty scraps of corn crunch beneath their feet, students were greeted with a tractor ride around the farmlands- views of pig pens, farmland, and towering birch trees.

Farmer Jeff and his crew then introduced students to the chicken pen where juniors like Zoe Hendricks, Oliver Burke, Ritvik Chennupati, Franci Yang, Cate Brownlee, and Sara Windus tossed pieces of bread to the hungry birds.

Following compost piles and cow feedings, beehives and hogs, the corn maze proved to be an ultimate treat for classes as they raced through the stalks to find hidden paths. Harvest season was long over; but AP Human Geography students had spent valuable hours learning what went into it.

 

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